How to Painting Window Frames

It seems like there's always a window in need of painting, whether you're matching a new room scheme or just sprucing things up. The actual painting isn't difficult, but you should know what you're getting into before you start. If you can, remove the window frames before painting them. Newer windows are released by pushing them against their spring-loaded jambs. Don't paint the edges of windows – they'll slide easier if unpainted. Older windows – those with sash cord weights – are more difficult. You can paint older windows in place, but don't paint them shut.

 
 
1. To paint double-hung windows, you'll want to remove them from their frames. Newer, spring-mounted windows are released by pushing against the frame. If you have an older window, consider painting it in place.
 
2. Drill holes and insert two nails into the legs of a wooden stepladder, and mount the window easel-style for easy painting. Or, lay the window flat on a bench or sawhorses. Don't paint the sides or the bottom of the sashes.
 
3. Using a tapered sash brush, begin by painting the wood next to the glass. Use the narrow edge of brush and overlap paint onto the glass to create a weathertight seal.
 
4. Clean any excess paint off the glass with a putty knife wrapped in a clean cloth. Rewrap the knife often so that you always wipe with a clean piece of fabric. Overlap the paint onto the glass about 1/16 of an inch to create a good seal.
 
5. Paint the flat portions of the sashes, then the case moldings, the sill, and the apron. Use slow, careful brush strokes. If you're painting with the sash in place, you'll want to avoid getting paint between the sash and frame. For casement windows, open them up completely before painting.
 
6. If you must paint your windows in place, move the painted windows up and down several times during the drying period to keep them from sticking. You can use a putty knife to avoid touching the painted surfaces.
 

 

 

Helpful Tips


Brushing tips. When painting molding and woodwork with a brush, you can mask off adjacent areas that you do not want to paint (for instance window panes). Use wide masking tape along the edge you want to maintain.


Avoid painting in direct sunlight.
Heat blistering may result if a hot sun causes too rapid drying of the paint film, trapping solvents which later vaporize and put pressure against the topcoat. This is most common with dark color coatings which are naturally heat absorbent.

 
 
 
 
 

| Site Map | Add Link Resources | Privacy Policy © 2016 PainterClick.com All Rights Reserved.