This glossary of Paint terms is one of the largest available on the Internet.

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Paint Terms Beginning with the Letter: B

BENZINE: Often used as a lacquer dilutent. Highly volatile and a fire hazard in shipping and storing.
BENZENE: Powerful but highly toxic and flammable solvent, usually restricted to spray application.
BINDER: Film-forming ingredient in paint that binds the pigment particles together.
BACK PRIMED: When a coat of paint is applied to the back of woodwork and exterior siding to prevent moisture from entering the wood and causing the grain to swell.
BLEEDING: Undercoat staining through the top coat.
BLEACHING: The process of restoring discolored or stained wood to its normal color or making it lighter.
BLUSHING: A gloss film turning flat or a clear lacquer turning white, usually caused by moisture condensation during the drying process.
BLISTERING: The formation of bubbles or pimples on the painted surface caused by moisture in the wood, by painting before the previous coat has dried thoroughly, or by excessive heat or grease under the paint.
BOXING: Mixing paint by pouring from one container to another several times to ensure thorough mixing.
BODY: The thickness or thinness of a liquid paint.
BRUSHABILITY: The ability or ease with which a paint can be brushed.
BREATHE: The ability of a paint film to permit the passage of moisture vapor without causing blistering, cracking, or peeling.
BRISTLE: The working part of a brush containing natural bristle (usually hog hair) or artificial bristle (nylon or polyester).
BRIDGING: Ability of paint to span small gaps or cracks through its cohesion and elastic qualities.
BUILD: Thickness or depth of paint film.
BUBBLES: Air bubbles in a drying paint film caused by excessive brushing during application or by over vigorous mixing that results in air entrapment.
BRUSH-OUT: A technique sometimes used to influence a large sale, that consists of brushing out a sample of paint onto a slab of wood or other material so the customer can see how the finished job will look.
BURNING IN: Repairing a finish by melting stick shellac into the damaged places, by using a heated knife blade or Iron.
BURNISHING: Shiny or lustrous spots on a paint surface caused by rubbing.
BRUSH MARKS: Marks of brush that remain in the dried Paint film.

 

Painting tips & tricks of the day


Paint without removing fixtures
To avoid having to remove fixtures before painting, particularly when the pieces are difficult to get off, nothing works like Vaseline petroleum jelly. Just spread it on the surfaces to be protected before starting to paint and when finished, clean the fixtures with a paper towel or a soft cloth.

Removing paint on glass and windows
It is well known that dried paint can be removed from glass with a razor blade. If the glass objects are textured or uneven, soak them in water and dishwasher liquid for a few hours.
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

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