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Painting Ceiling and Walls ( Page 1 of 3 )

 
PainterClick.com Offer tips for paint ceiling and walls as efficiently as possible without making a mess.
 

Surface Preparation

The first thing I do when painting a room spread professional-quality canvas drop cloths to cover and protect the floor. Spilled paint doesn't soak through canvas as it does a bed sheet or other lightweight cloth, and canvas is safer to walk on. Working on a plastic drop cloth can be like painting on roller skates.
The plaster walls in the room needed some fairly extensive patching work. In this type of situation, I start by fixing all the questionable areas, taking care not to create a lot of dust that might get into fresh paint. Next,
I caulk all gaps between the trim (baseboard, window and door casing) and the walls with a high-quality paintable caulk. I smooth the caulk with a damp rag. Caulking always makes the finished paint job look better.
I also make sure that the room I'm painting has adequate lighting. Even if there is a lot of natural light,
I always have halogen work lights and clip-on parabolic lights handy.
The next step is prepping and priming the trim. Painting trim is a different kettle of fish, but I make sure that the trim paint overlaps the wall about 1/8 in. When the trim is primed, I begin work on the walls and ceiling, letting the finish coat on the trim covers any stray paint from the walls.

 

Priming

The ceiling and walls in the room had water stains from an old roof leak that had been fixed; also, the former owners of the house were heavy smokers, which left the ceiling and walls stained. So I decided to cover everything with a stain blocking primer. "BULLS EYE".
The two steps to painting a large area are cutting in and rolling. Cutting in is brushing paint onto areas the roller won't reach.
Painters naturally start at the top and work down; I stand on a ladder and paint everything I won't be able reach comfortably from the floor. For cutting in, I never work out of the paint can but instead use a cut bucket. You can buy one or make one. I cut in with a 3-in. brush to give me a 3-in. band to roll into. Because the ceiling and walls are being painted with the same primer, I cut in the corners without being too careful, using the flat part of the brush on both sides of the corner.
Where the primer meets the prepped trim, I paint up to the edge of the trim using the narrow side of the brush, overlapping the wall primer onto the trim slightly but not being overly accurate with my line at this point. Overlapping coats at the edges of the trim creates a less stark line between the trim paint and the wall paint. When I've finished cutting in the upper parts of the room from the ladder, I work from the floor cutting in the rest.

 

Rolling equipment

Once the entire room is cut in, it's on to the rolling. The first thing I need is a roller frame, which is the handle and holder for the roller pad. Roller frames come in an amazing array of widths and shapes, but I usually stick with the standard 9-in. model. I avoid cheap roller frames because they don't hold up well.
The next-most-important tool for painting ceiling and walls is a telescoping extension pole. These poles come in various sizes, but for most rooms with flat ceilings, a 4-ft. pole that telescopes to 8 ft. or so works great.
I avoid screw-together extension poles; they're a lot of trouble.
The extension pole has a broom-handle thread on one end that screws into the roller frame. This tool keeps me from running up and down a stepladder to paint ceilings. If I paint a ceiling without an extension pole,
I end up working directly under the roller, getting spattered as I paint.
Next, I need the correct roller pad for the job and paint I'm applying. For smooth surfaces, a roller pad with a short nap (1/4-in. to 1/2 in.) is fine. But if you are covering heavy stucco, you may need as much as a
1-1/2-in. nap. For the oil-based primer that I'm using for the job in the photos, I chose an inexpensive 3/8-in. nap roller pad good for any kind of paint.

 

Painting tips & tricks


Helpful Tip
When taking a break, don't leave your brushes or rollers sitting in paint. Cover trays with a damp rag.

Helpful Tip
When you accidentally drip paint on an adjacent surface, wipe it off immediately. Otherwise it can start to dry and will be much more difficult to remove later.

Helpful Tip
Brushes and rollers can last through many projects if properly cared for. Clean them thoroughly. Wrap and store brushes in a paper towel to help them maintain their cutting edge.

Helpful Tip
When painting with dramatically different colors, apply the lighter color first and the darker color last.

Helpful Tip
If you use a good, stain blocking primer, you can usually get away with 1 finished coat of paint.

Helpful Tip
For overnight breaks, you can wrap your brushes and rollers in plastic wrap and put them in the freezer. Tightly seal cans and clean trays.

 

Choosing the right paint texture
Each paint finish has its own properties. The more matte the finish, the more it hides imperfections and uneven reflections, but it's less washable. The glossier the finish, the more washable it is, but also the more sensitive to imperfections and it will mask less efficiently. In order: glossy, semi-gloss, pearl, eggshell, satin, matte. Semi-gloss is best for hall walls and for windows and frames; use matte on ceilings and satin and pearl for the rest. Kitchens, bathrooms and basements have their own antifungal paints.

Drying paint and the temperature
Paint in a ventilated and temperate space. When temperatures are between 10C and 32C there's no risk, although 15c to 22C is ideal. Latex paint will dry in a few hours at this temperature. Oil-based paints will dry more rapidly in a warm, dry environment.

Wood preparation before painting
When we paint wood, we're decorating it, but we can also protect it for good if the surface is prepared properly. New wood must be sanded along the grain. Painted or stained wood as well, unless you strip it down to its bare surface. Pores, screw and nail holes can be filled with plastic wood or joint compound, according to the case. Remove all accessories to minimize trimming. Paint over knots with orange shellac to hide them forever. Finally, be sure that the wood is dry and clean.

Painting old moldings
Over the years and after many coats of paint, door frames, windows and wall molding joints are no longer well defined and easy to trim. Carefully trace over the joints with a plasterboard knife using a yardstick if necessary. The traced cut will act as a paint dam? as long as you don't use too much.

Paint without removing fixtures
To avoid having to remove fixtures before painting, particularly when the pieces are difficult to get off, nothing works like Vaseline petroleum jelly. Just spread it on the surfaces to be protected before starting to paint and when finished, clean the fixtures with a paper towel or a soft cloth.

 

Do It Yourself Projects

 

 

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